Current
    Potential Wor(l)ds
    Futures Within, Futures Without
2022
   
Practicing the Difference
    Moving Worlds
2021
   
Recipes for Disaster

2020
    Warm Worlds and Otherwise
    W.I.T.C.H. (Redux)
2019
~all the feels~
  Fandom’s Fantoms
2018
   
More Generous and More Suspicious”
   figure feels fantoms
2017
    The Labours of Barren House
    eyefeels
    Witchy Methodologies
    From Specters to Speculations
    The Linguists: Suzette Haden Elgin/Luce Irigaray
    I AM SF

    Native Tongue Reading Group

2016
    W.I.T.C.H.
2015
    Pioneer
2014
    A Description of a New World, Called The Blazing World
2013
    More Strange Than True

About ︎

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Mark
Installation view at Jerwood Space, London, 2017.  Photo: Anna Arca

           
This body of work was informed by a period of research undertaken in the archives of the University of Oregon exploring Láadan – the constructed ‘women’s language’ that was developed by Suzette Haden Elgin in her science fiction trilogy Native Tongue (1984-1994).  

An animation, titled The Linguists, draws on imagery of witchcraft and séances to channel the spirit of Elgin’s interest in the production of subversive and transformative knowledges. 


Extracts from The Linguists, HD video with sound, 8 minutes 4 seconds, 2017


The etymology of the word ‘glamour’ – drawn from the Greek gramma, meaning 'letter', and in fifteenth century English coming to mean a witch’s spell that created the illusion of castration – inspires the strange re-imagining of a lipstick-like substance.  This bloody fluid is applied to the mouth by the protagonists’ tongues, and transferred to ritual objects through kisses, before eventually flooding their surroundings.


Fingerspell (“G.L.A.M.O.U.R”), mixed media, 2016. Photos: Anna Arca


The painting objects, titled Mother Tongue and Fingerspell (“G.L.A.M.O.U.R”), take up the ideas around embodied perception and language that underpin The Linguists.  Translating the ritual figure from this animated storyworld into monumental ruins encountered by a viewer in space, these painting objects perform as the fictional artifacts of future histories.  


Mother Tongue, mixed media, 2016. Photos: Anna Arca


The Labours of Barren House was originally created for Jerwood Solo Presentations 2017, supported by Jerwood Charitable Foundation.  Research in The University of Oregon Special Collections and University Archive was supported by the AHRC London Arts & Humanities Partnership Research Fund. 


︎    Read text by James Gormley ︎


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